Monitoring my WiFi access point with Prometheus

My home WiFi router is an ASUS RT-AC66U. It’s a great device with a tolerable manufacturer provided UI and quite a lot of advanced features. Though it’s marketed as a WiFi router I use it as a WiFi access point and switch, it doesn’t route. I have a Linux box that does that.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on monitoring, golang, and prometheus

GeoIP based filtering with iptables

One of the issues I run into when running a server, at home or anywhere else, is the crazy amount of random attempts at SSH logins. My SSH configuration is strict enough that most of these attempts just die on the key exchange, they never even get past the handshake. Then there’s fail2ban ensuring you get temporarily blocked if you’re obviously trying to brute force anything.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on security, iptables, and geoip

Releasing sixrd

My ISP (Telia) doesn’t do native IPv6 yet (like most ISPs unfortunately). However, they do support something called IPv6 Rapid Deployment, also known as 6rd. What it does is fairly simply, it encodes in the information you get from your ISP during a DHCPv4 chat the information needed to set up a 6to4 tunnel with an endpoint provided by your ISP. Getting native v6 would be the best but this is probably the closest I’m going to get in a while.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on ipv6, 6rd, and network

My home monitoring setup

Over the past few months I’ve started to reassemble a home server. I managed to get a great server board with 2 Xeon E5’s and 128GB of ECC RAM (b/c why not?) and spent Saturday breaking in the hard drives, setting everything up to be nice and encrypted and so on.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on monitoring, prometheus, and docker

Goodbye, Puppet

This has been a hard blog post to write, but to me it feels like it’s been a long time coming.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on foss, community, and puppet

The right tools for the job

Every now and then I find myself in discussions with people around which tools we should use for what job. This comes up especially often in the context of FOSS with regards to communication platforms. Do we use IRC, Slack, Gitter? Also, are mailing lists still a thing? Should we have a Discourse instead?

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on foss, community, and opensource

whois on OS X

One of the things I find myself doing from time to time it to execute the whois command. This allows me to figure out to whom an IP(range) or domain belongs. However, when doing this on OS X, especially with IPv6 addresses I’m greeted with:

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on network, ipv6, whois,, and osx

IPv6 at home

I recently moved to a new place (because the rental market is cray cray here). Despite how annoying it is to move around a benefit of the new place is that it has fiber so I wasted no time and got a connection from Telia.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on network, ipv6, and 6rd

I'm going to FOSDEM and I'm bringing

FOSDEM is a wonderful event. But as with any event with geeks people will try to sniff your traffic, mess with GSM, grab your credentials and what not.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on foss, fosdem, security, streisand, vpn, openvpn, ipsec, socks, and socks5

PGP, one last try

Over the years I’ve tried to use PGP multiple times. However, I’ve always failed miserably at managing keys and understanding the lifecycle involved. This is evident by searching the keyservers for my name, it’ll turn up a few rather idiotic and dubiously keys. None of them should be used except for one, 0x18D40820FA0EE03C.

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Author's profile picture Daniele Sluijters on pgp, gpg, and security